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Monday, July 27, 2020 | History

3 edition of The different extent of privatisation proceeds in EU countries found in the catalog.

The different extent of privatisation proceeds in EU countries

The different extent of privatisation proceeds in EU countries

a preliminary explanation using a public choice approach

  • 390 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published by IZA in Bonn, Germany .
Written in English

    Places:
  • European Union countries.
    • Subjects:
    • Privatization -- European Union countries.,
    • Social choice -- European Union countries.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby Ansgar Belke ...[et al.].
      SeriesDiscussion paper ;, no. 1741, Discussion paper (Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit : Online) ;, no. 1741
      ContributionsBelke, Ansgar.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHD5701
      The Physical Object
      FormatElectronic resource
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3478713M
      LC Control Number2005618892

      Privatisation is defined in more general terms as the transfer of ownership and control from the public to the private sector. This can be executed in a number of different ways. In countries where capital markets are developed, privatisation is effected through the sale of the enterprise's equity to the public. In developing countries where. the six countries, with no central EU policy driving national developments in this case. Sweden and the UK were again pacesetters back in the mids but in the other countries there have not been clear and coherent attempts to open up markets to competition in a systematic way. Privatisation and liberalisation of postal services.

      Majority of respondents in six European countries want to clamp down on tax evaders and polluters post-pandemic. 7/16/20, AM CEST The . large extent reflects the size of the underlying economies – plus the fact that unlike some other big OECD countries the governments in question still held a large portfolio of SOEs. A continuation of the privatisation programmes of Japan, Turkey and Australia also lifted these countries to high positions on the “Privatisation Top”.

        Furthermore, China privatisation program differs in key respects from many other countries. Not following the approaches of privatization used in market economies and the mass privatization tried in Lithuania, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Mongolia, and Russia, China developed its own path through “crossing the river by touching stones.”. Privatization has been a key element of structural reform in many developing and transition economies during the last decade. This paper examines the fiscal and macroeconomic issues involved in the privatization of nonfinancial public enterprises in these economies. It considers issues such as the factors determining the proceeds from privatization and the amount .


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The different extent of privatisation proceeds in EU countries Download PDF EPUB FB2

Downloadable. This paper empirically investigates the differences in the motives of raising privatisation proceeds for a panel of EU countries from to More specifically, we test whether privatisations can be mainly interpreted (a) as ingredients of a larger reform package of economic liberalisation in formerly overregulated economies, (b) as a reaction to an increasing.

The Different Extent of Privatisation Proceeds in EU Countries: A Preliminary Explanation Using a Public Choice Approach by Ansgar Belke*, Frank Baumgärtner*, Friedrich Schneider** and Ralph Setzer*** Abstract This paper empirically investigates the differences in the motives of raising privatisation.

IZA DP No. The Different Extent of Privatisation Proceeds in EU Countries: A Preliminary Explanation Using a Public Choice Approach Ansgar H. Belke, Frank Baumgärtner, Friedrich Schneider, Ralph Setzer. The Different Extent of Privatisation Proceeds in EU Countries: A Preliminary Explanation Using a Public Choice Approach This paper empirically investigates the differences in the motives of raising privatisation proceeds for a panel of EU countries from to More specifically, we test whether.

Add tags for "The different extent of privatisation proceeds in EU countries: a preliminary explanation using a public choice approach". Be the first. Confirm this request. The different extent of privatisation proceeds in EU countries: A preliminary explanation using a public choice approach Article (PDF Available) in.

BibTeX @MISC{Belke_oflaborthe, author = {Ansgar Belke and Frank Baumgärtner and Friedrich Schneider and Ralph Setzer and Ansgar Belke and Frank Baumgärtner and Friedrich Schneider and Ralph Setzer}, title = {of LaborThe Different Extent of Privatisation Proceeds in EU Countries: A Preliminary Explanation Using a Public Choice Approach}, year = {}}.

Downloadable (with restrictions). This paper empirically investigates the differences in the motives for raising privatization proceeds for a panel of 22 OECD countries from to We test whether privatizations can be mainly interpreted (a) as a means to foster growth, increase tax income, and relax the fiscal stance, (b) as a result of right-wing governments' more market.

Privatization proceeds in the EU, – (million dollars) Source: Elaborated by the authors based on Privatization Barometer (). Privatization revenues in the EU. The privatization of large state-owned enterprises is one of the most radical policy developments of the last quarter century.

Right-wing governments have privatized in an effort to decrease the size of government, while left-wing governments have privatized either to compensate for the failures of state-owned firms or to generate revenues. In this way, privatization has spread from Europe.

In the EU as a whole, with countries addressing their government deficits post, privatization proceeds rose to a five-year peak into $ billion, and a nine-year peak of $ billion inwhile the annualized value of privatizations during (based on the first 8 months) reached $ billion.

The report presents quantitative information about the size and the extent of the State sell-offs and State ownership in major European countries, and analyzes the most important stylized facts about the causes and consequences of the process.

The main findings can be summarized as follows. Privatization in western Europe. The company was folded and re-created inand privatized inunder the supervision of the EU and IMF, as it was part of the debt-restructuring process of OPAP (Lottery and Betting Monopoly) - privatization completed inwhen.

pose of ranking the 18 EU countries for which data was available in terms of privatisation proceeds. The rank-ings illustrate some noteworthy results. For example, four countries within the top 10 are Eastern European countries, with three of these appearing in the top five.

Furthermore, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and the. describe different methods of privatization as well as provide examples of privatization taking place around the world (with an emphasis on Eastern Europe).

The third section of the paper will present an empirical study done by Paul Cook and Yuichiro Uchida, analyzing the effects of privatization on economic growth in developing countries. Add tags for "Different Extent of Privatisation Proceeds in EU Countries: A Preliminary Explanation Using a Public Choice Approach.".

Be the first. Confirm this request. The book identifies different national characteristics in terms of the motivation to privatise, the scale of privatization and its consequences.

In the opening chapters there is a detailed overview of the theoretical economic issues involved in privatisation and an assessment of privatization across the EU. Privatisation operations were increasingly undertaken by governments starting from the mid-eighties in most western countries.

The transition to market economy in the Central and Eastern Europe during the nineties was also a context where these operations were developed on a large scale.

It is also a challenge on other continents. This study reviews privatization in each of the member states of the European Union. It identifies differences in the levels of privatization activity between countries.

It also emphasizes four reasons for the level of interest in privatization within the EU at the present time, with expected economic efficiency gains being but one reason. Governments of very different political and ideo-logical streams are bent on privatizing, and governments that are already privatizing are moving from selling small retail outlets and industries to selling larger mining and infrastructure enterprises.

The World Bank's. interest in privatization stems from its fundamental goals-to help its. more complete picture of the extent of privatization in a sample of countries over the last 15 years. In Argentina, for instance, SOE activity was about 3 percent of GDP inas shown in Figure 5, and the accumulated proceeds from privatization for the period – were about 14 percent of GDP.Privatisation patterns in Africa: a few countries only 14 Privatisation in South Asia: a slow opening 15 4 Regulation and competition 18 Approaches and Regulatory framework in the OECD 18 Regulation of utilities: the experience of developing countries 19 5 Effects of privatisation: efficiency and firm performance   Proceeds from all illicit markets, including ones run by organized crime, in the twenty-eight countries of the European Union were estimated to be at least $ billion.

But that estimate is low. In some EU countries, some markets, such as human trafficking, illegal gambling, match fixing, extortion racketeering and money lending, could not be.